Reflexology, Possible Therapeutic Approach to Alzheimer’s
Jeudi 24 septembre 2020

US National Institute on Aging, Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center / Public domain

Part 3 of 3

Could a reflexology technique serve as a therapeutic approach for those with Alzheimer’s?  The possibility exists that a targeted reflexology technique could mirror the researched effects of targeted light and sound techniques to help dissipate tangled amyloid plaque areas commonly found in the brains of those with Alzheimer’s. Linking sight, sound and the pressure techniques of reflexology is the sensory experience provided by each. 

Exposure of “Alzheimer’s mice” to specific sound and light has been demonstrated by MIT researchers to increase activity of gamma brain waves and, as a result, lessen amyloid plaque areas in the mice brains. (1) (2)

Pull Quote

“Gamma (brain wave) activity represents an important marker of successful memory formation, episodic recall and other behavioral and cognitive functions. Sensorimotor, learning memory, information processing, and behavioral functions are important in everyday life of humans and are also integral in execution of life processes.” (3)

Gamma brain waves are known to decrease in activity for those with Alzheimer’s. In both the light and sound studies it was found, “Once the brain is flushed with gamma waves, two effects come into play: fewer amyloid plaques are produced and more of these existing plaques are cleared out by immune cells known as microglia.” 

MIT researchers found specific light exposure created change in brain waves of the visual cortex of the brain while specific sound exposure created change in the auditory cortex as well as a nearby area, the hippocampos. Further areas of the brain were found to be effected by exposure to light over a longer period of time. 

The researchers hypothesize that other sensory experiences could impact further areas of the brain. ‘If we can activate gamma (brain waves) in many different brain regions, perhaps we can get a huge area of the brain involved,’ says (MIT researcher Dr. Li-Huei), Tsai. ‘Treating the whole brain will be important for people with Alzheimer’s disease.’” (1)

MIT researchers would like to determine “whether other modes of sensory stimulation, such as sound or touch, have similar effects on the regions of the brain that process those inputs. Ultimately, the goal is to find multiple ways to noninvasively stimulate the brain so that the induced gamma waves propagate strongly throughout it.”

Reflexology technique application provides the sensory experience of pressure to the feet and hands. Kunz and Kunz posited this theory in 1981 following work with paralyzed individuals.  Pressure sensors in the feet communicate information about movement as well as activities throughout the body including mechanisms such as the autonomic nervous system. (3) 

Researchers working with healthy male subjects found that targeted reflexology work created increased gamma and beta brain wave activity in the frontal cortex of the brain. (1)  


“The frontal lobe (cortex) is the part of the brain that controls important cognitive skills in humans, such as emotional expression, problem solving, memory, language, judgment, and sexual behaviors. It is, in essence, the “control panel” of our personality and our ability to communicate.… “It is also responsible for primary motor function, or our ability to consciously move our muscles, and the two key areas related to speech, including Broca’s area.” (5)


What specific sensory experiences created increase in gamma brain waves? 


Exposing “Alzheimer’s mice” for an hour a day for a week to lights flickering at the speed of 40 hertz per second “sharply reduced” by half the build-up of beta-amyloid plaque in the visual cortex of mice brains. Longer term treatment showed 

MIT researchers also studied using sound to increase activity of gamma waves in the brain. Mice were exposed to sound at a hum of 40 hertz for an hour a day. Results were even more promising than those of the light study. Reduced was the plaque in not only the auditory cortex of the brain but a near-by area the hippocampos where memories are stored.

A reflex area reflecting the cortex of the brain located in the ball of the big toe was targeted by reflexology researchers. Five minutes of application to each big toe for seven consecutive days resulted in an increase in gamma brain waves.

Further implications for targeted reflexology 

Does reflexology effect amyloid plaque? Such research has not been conducted. (Amyloid imaging using the PET (positron emission tomography) has emerged as a method other than post mortem autopsy. (6)) The possibilities are intriguing. As noted below in more recent research at MIT, longer term application of sensory stimulation of light included effects beyond those noted above. 

Further results benefiting those with Alzheimer’s are possible. “… MIT researchers tested the effects of longer-term treatment by exposing mouse models with more advanced Alzheimer’s disease to up to 6 weeks of gamma entrainment by visual stimulation. Results showed stimulation increased gamma brain waves in the visual cortex and higher-order brain areas, including the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Continuing stimulation also preserved neuronal and synaptic density in these brain regions, improved performance on memory tasks, and reduced inflammation. Findings point to an overall neuroprotective effect, even in the later stages of neurodegeneration, the researchers reported.” (7)


(1) Dougherty, Elizabeth, “Seeing the Light, Aging Brain Initiative researchers discover a potential Alzheimer’s therapy,” Spectrum (MIT), Spring 2017

(2) “Low-Hum Therapy Seems to Counteract Alzheimer’s Symptoms in Mice” https://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/low-hum-therapy-seems-to-counteract-alzheimer-s-symptoms-in-mice/

(3) Cevat Unal, Menizibeya O.Welcome, Mariam Salako, Faruk Abdullahi, Nuhu M. Abubakar, Vladimir A.Pereverzev, Siti Sugih Hartiningsih, Senol Dane, “The effect of foot reflexotherapy on the dynamics of cortical oscillatory waves in healthy humans: An EEG study,” Complementary Therapies in MedicineVolume 38, June 2018 , Pages 42-47

(4) Kunz, Barbara, Kunz, Kevin, The Complete Guide to Foot Reflexology (Third Edition), RRP Press, 2005

(5) https://www.healthline.com/human-body-maps/frontal-lobe#1

(6) Subapriya Suppiah, Melanie-Anne Didier, Sobhan Vinjamuri,” The Who, When, Why, and How of PET Amyloid Imaging in Management of Alzheimer’s Disease—Review of Literature and Interesting Images,”  Diagnostics (Basel). 2019 Jun; 9(2): 65., PMCID: PMC6627350, PMID: 31242587

(7) https://www.nia.nih.gov/news/noninvasive-brain-wave-treatment-reduces-alzheimers-pathology-improves-memory-mice


Books by Kunz and Kunz

Research Books

Medical Applications of Reflexology: Findings in Research About Post-operative care, Maternity Care and Cancer Care
Evidenced Based Reflexology Research: For Health Professionals and Researchers
Medical applications of Reflexology:: Findings in Research about Cancer Care

Bestselling Books


 Reflexology: Hands-on Treatment for Vitality and Well-being
Complete Reflexology for Life: Your Definitive Photographic Reference to the Best Techniques and Treatments  
 

Intermittent Moving Books

Intermittent Moving: How I Lost My Pants and Mastered My Weight
Un-Sit Your Life: The Reflex "Diet" Solution



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Is There an Alzheimer’s Sign on the Foot?
Mercredi 23 septembre 2020


Part 2 of 3

Could a part of the big toes associated with the cortex brain reflex area signal the presence of Alzheimer’s disease or the possibility for it? Would such an indicator on the foot have implications for diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer’s? 

Clinical experience and research raise possibilities.

Our first inkling of such a possibility occurred some thirty years ago. One of the participants in a Winnipeg workshop stood to tell his story. He had observed a distinctive and similar appearance to twenty-one of twenty-three pairs of feet during a visit to his father and fellow residents. All lived in an Alzheimer’s ward. what he had observed was a fleshiness or protrusion on the ball of the big toe. For some individuals the protrusion created a flap of skin extending under the second toe on which they walked.

Years later there it was in a research report into reflexology work and brain wave activity related to Alzheimer’s: a black and white line drawing representing what was, in essence, the area of the big toe described years ago by the visitor to the Alzheimer’s ward. During the research reflexology work was applied to the broad central area of first segment of the big toe, a brain reflex area. The results showed gamma and beta brain waves significantly increased in activity following reflexology work. Gamma brain waves are known to decrease in activity for those with Alzheimer’s. (1)

“Gamma (brain wave) activity represents an important marker of successful memory formation, episodic recall and other behavioral and cognitive functions. Sensorimotor, learning memory, information processing, and behavioral functions are important in everyday life of humans and are also integral in execution of life processes.” (1)

Observation of this visual stress has been a part of Kevin’s practice since the Winnipeg class. When he sees a pronounced area on a client’s foot, he asks, Do you have memory problems? (2) One woman responded, only half joking, I forget where the kids are. He has observed the stress cue in mothers and in daughters, lessened with the younger woman but demonstrating the potential hereditary lineage of Alzheimer’s. One study found heredity to be 46% of the risk for Alzheimer’s.

Aside from serving as a possible indicator of memory problems and more, such a stress cue serves as a target area for reflexology work. It is a basic tenet of reflexology that such work creates change.

(1) Cevat Unal, Menizibeya O.Welcome, Mariam Salako, Faruk Abdullahi, Nuhu M. Abubakar, Vladimir A.Pereverzev, Siti Sugih Hartiningsih, Senol Dane, “The effect of foot reflexotherapy on the dynamics of cortical oscillatory waves in healthy humans: An EEG study,” Complementary Therapies in MedicineVolume 38, June 2018 , Pages 42-47

 

Books by Kunz and Kunz

Research Books

Medical Applications of Reflexology: Findings in Research About Post-operative care, Maternity Care and Cancer Care
Evidenced Based Reflexology Research: For Health Professionals and Researchers
Medical applications of Reflexology:: Findings in Research about Cancer Care

Bestselling Books


 Reflexology: Hands-on Treatment for Vitality and Well-being
Complete Reflexology for Life: Your Definitive Photographic Reference to the Best Techniques and Treatments  
 

Intermittent Moving Books

Intermittent Moving: How I Lost My Pants and Mastered My Weight
Un-Sit Your Life: The Reflex "Diet" Solution



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Research Shows Possible Alzheimer’s Game Changer: Targeted Reflexology Technique
Mardi 22 septembre 2020


Part 1 of 3

Who wouldn’t want to think better as well as take possible preventive action against Alzheimer’s, dementia and a whole host of neurological and psychiatric disorders? That’s the promise of a recent reflexology study.

It’s all about brain wave activity and how reflexology can influence it. Previous studies have demonstrated that reflexology work applied to the whole foot creates a change in brain waves, activity of alpha brain waves shown when we’re relaxed. 

The current research shows that reflexology work targeting a brain reflex area significantly increased activity of gamma brain waves and beta brain waves. Gamma brain waves are associated with cognitive functions such as memory, perception, and attention. Beta brain waves are associated with stress, anxiety and motor control. (1)

Gamma brain waves are seen to decrease in those with Alzheimer’s. Gamma and/or beta activity is seen to be abnormal in those with a number of neurological or psychiatric disorders. (1)

Brain waves allow information to be shared among parts of the brain. When the rhythmic activity of brain waves is dysfunctional and information sharing is disrupted a number of conditions can result. With abnormal beta and/or gamma waves these include: autism, ADHD (Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder), Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy as well as chronic pain, schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, irritability, agitation, insomnia, bipolar tendencies, and substance abuse and.

During the research, reflexology work was applied to a broad central area of the first segment of the big toes, five minutes per toe for seven consecutive days. As measured by EEG (electroencephalogram) before and after the work, activity of gamma and beta waves increased significantly. (1)

“Gamma waves ripple across the brain about 40 times per second and appear when the brain is doing attentive work, such as forming memories or solving problems.” (2)

For those with Alzheimer’s gamma brain waves are known to slow down. Resulting is interruption in what gamma waves do. As noted by researchers: “Gamma activity represents an important marker of successful memory formation, episodic recall and other behavioral and cognitive functions. Sensorimotor, learning memory, information processing, and behavioral functions are important in everyday life of humans and are also integral in execution of life processes. Increase in gamma active (sic) is also associated with emotion.” The researchers concluded: “Thus reflexotherapy may serve as a technique that can be used to increase cognitive functions in humans.”(1)

The potential impact on lives can be imagined. Talk to almost anyone and you’ll find concern for the possibility of dementia or Alzheimer’s. For those with a family history of Alzheimer’s concern is increased. Could a simple reflexology technique, easy-to-do and with no cost associated, offer a preventive measure?

(1) Cevat Unal, Menizibeya O.Welcome, Mariam Salako, Faruk Abdullahi, Nuhu M. Abubakar, Vladimir A.Pereverzev, Siti Sugih Hartiningsih, Senol Dane, “The effect of foot reflexotherapy on the dynamics of cortical oscillatory waves in healthy humans: An EEG study,” Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 38, June 2018 , Pages 42-47

(2) Dougherty, Elizabeth, “Seeing the Light, Aging Brain Initiative researchers discover a potential Alzheimer’s therapy,” Spectrum (MIT), Spring 2017

(3) https://www.centerforadd-az.com/resources/understanding-brainwaves


Books by Kunz and Kunz

Research Books

Medical Applications of Reflexology: Findings in Research About Post-operative care, Maternity Care and Cancer Care
Evidenced Based Reflexology Research: For Health Professionals and Researchers
Medical applications of Reflexology:: Findings in Research about Cancer Care

Bestselling Books


 Reflexology: Hands-on Treatment for Vitality and Well-being
Complete Reflexology for Life: Your Definitive Photographic Reference to the Best Techniques and Treatments  
 

Intermittent Moving Books

Intermittent Moving: How I Lost My Pants and Mastered My Weight
Un-Sit Your Life: The Reflex "Diet" Solution




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Reflexology Research with Ventilator-Dependent Patients: Methods for Positive Results
Mercredi 26 aot 2020

Brian Hall / Public domain
How to get results. This is always a topic of interest to reflexologists. The discussion centers around where to apply technique, how frequently and for how long a period of time to apply technique. 


The same issue is important for researchers working with patients in a hospital setting. Setting such parameters is a part of establishing Method for a study. Defining Method in a study is critical to ascertain a potential future protocol that will create results. This is a part of evidence-based medicine. Here we consider the reflex areas and amount of time utilized in research with ventilator-dependent patients.


Following are synopses of research with ventilator-dependent patients. Some studies found positive results, others did not. As common with research, researchers cite and consider methods in similar studies seeking to understand reported results. Study (1), for example was criticized for using different reflexologists. As you look through the synopsis, consider the Method and positive or negative results.


Multiple studies show that reflexology helps in the treatment of patients on mechanical ventilators. Patients experience: Improved physiological parameters (positive results in (2) and (5), negative results in (1) and (3)); Lessened anxiety and agitation (positive results as well as better sleep and patient-ventilator synchrony (5), negative results (4); less use of drugs for sedation (5); shorter length of time on the ventilator (weaning time) (Positive results for all three studies1, 2, 3) and increased level of consciousness for those in a coma (6). Five of the six studies, noted  use of reflexology as “an effective nursing intervention,” recommended training in and use of foot reflexology for patients on mechanical ventilators. (1, 2, 3, 5, 6,7)


(1) Researched: Physiological parameters (Pulse rate, respiratory rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, mean arterial pressure, percutaneous oxygen saturation); Weaning time

Researchers Abbas Ebadi et al noted the method implemented in their research: Following open heart surgery (OHS), transfer to an OHS-ICU and placement on a mechanical ventilator (MV), 31 patients who had been randomly assigned to the study’s reflexology group received on each foot 7 to 10 minutes of reflexology work applied to the lung and heart reflex areas. Work was applied by same-gender nurses. Measured were pulse rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure and oxygen saturation. 

Results were reported as: “Study findings also showed that although reflexology had no significant effect on physiological parameters, it significantly reduced the length of MV weaning time. The mean of weaning time in the reflexology group was 39.11 min shorter than the control group.…

“Conclusion: Study findings indicate that foot reflexology is an effective nursing intervention for facilitating MV weaning after OHS. Given the simplicity, safety, and cost-effectiveness of foot reflexology, we recommend the development and implementation of reflexology training programs for both nursing and practicing nurses.”

(1) Abbas Ebadi, Parasoo Kavei, Seyyed Tayyeb Moradian, Yaser Saeid, “The Effect of Foot Reflexology on Physiologic Parameters and Mechanical Ventilation Weaning Time in Patients Undergoing Open-Heart Surgery: A Clinical Trial Study” Complement Ther Clin Pract 2015 Aug;21(3):188-92. PMID: 26256138 DOI: 10.1016/j.ctcp.2015.07.001


(2) Researched: Physiological parameters (Heart rate, respiratory rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, oxygen saturation), Weaning time, Sedation and analgesic drug use

Researchers Amira Elsayed et al noted the method implemented in their research. Monitored six times were: (a) heart rate, (b) respiratory rate, (c) systolic and (d) diastolic blood pressure, (e) mean arterial pressure and (f) oxygen saturation. Following open heart surgery and within 60 minutes of being admitted to the cardio-thoracic ICU, 40 patients who had been randomly assigned to the study’s reflexology group received on each foot 15 to 30 minutes of reflexology work applied to the lung and heart reflex areas. 


Results demonstrated reflexology work positively affects stabilization of physiological parameters. were reported. Compared to the patients in the control group patients in the reflexology group experienced a: (a) statistically significant decrease in heart rate,  (b) significantly lower respiratory rate, (c) statistical significant reduction in the systolic blood pressure, (d) statistically significant lower diastolic blood pressure, (e) statistically significant drop in mean arterial pressure and (f) statistical significant elevation in the oxygen saturation level. Weaning time from the mechanical ventilator for those in the reflexology group was 270 minutes while in the control group it was 435 minutes. 


“Based on the results of our study, we conclude that foot reflexology massage can significantly enhance the physiological indicators, and shorten MV weaning time in patients undergone OHS (Open Heart Surgery). Therefore, foot reflexology massage can be incorporated into daily patient care in cardiothoracic ICU. Training programs on applying foot reflexology for critical care nurses are needed. Future large scale studies on different patient population are also required in order to obtain a strong evidence to support this approach and enrich the body of knowledge in this area. … 


“Conclusion: Foot reflexology is an effective method for stabilizing physiological indicators and decreasing ventilator dependence among patients undergoing OHS. Therefore, it can be introduced as an adjunct to daily care of OHS patients in ICU.” 

(2) Elsayed, Amira, Kandeel, Nahed, El-Aziz, Wafaa, “The Effect of Foot Reflexology on Physiological Indicators and Mechanical Ventilation Weaning Time among Open-Heart Surgery Patients” American Journal of Nursing Research. 2019, 7(4), 412-419 DOI: 10.12691/ajnr-7-4-2

(Full study http://pubs.sciepub.com/ajnr/7/4/2/index.html)


(3) Researched: Heart rate, oxygen saturation; Weaning time

Researcher Kandmire noted the method of the study: a twenty-thirty-minute foot reflexology session was applied post operatively to 42 non-randomly selected open heart surgery patients.


Results: “(As compared to those in the control group) Reflexology did not have a significant effect on physiological parameters in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support. Shortening the weaning time from mechanical ventilation suggests that it might be applied effectively in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support in intensive care unit.”

(3) Didem Kandemir, “How Effective Is Reflexology on Physiological Parameters and Weaning Time from Mechanical Ventilation in Patients Undergoing Cardiovascular Surgery?,” European Journal of Integrative Medicine 26 · February 2019DOI: 10.1016/j.eujim.2019.01.008


(4) Researched: Anxiety, Agitation

Researchers Kavei et al describe a double blind three group randomized study. Following open heart surgery: “Foot reflexology massage for 20 minutes was provided to patients in the experimental group on the reflection points in the heart and lungs. The rate of anxiety and agitation based on Faces of Anxiety Scale (FAS) and the Richmond Agitation Scale (RSAS) were recorded in 6 stages.”


“Conclusion: Foot reflexology massage in reflection points of the heart and lung in patients after surgery did not reduce anxiety and agitation in patients.”

(4) Kavei, P, Ebadi, A, Saeed Y, Moradian S. T., Sedigh Rahimabadi M, “Effect of Reflexology on Anxiety and Agitation in patients Under Mechanical Ventilation after Open Heart Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial Study,”  Journal of Clinical Nursing and Midwifery, Spring 2015, Volume 4, Number 1; Pages 16-26


(5) Physiological anxiety signs (Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, respiratory rate) and Sedation Needs

Researchers Akin Korhan et al note their method: “… a single blinded, randomized controlled design with repeated measures was used in the intensive care unit of a university hospital in Turkey. Patients (n = 60) aged between 18 and 70 years and were hospitalized in the intensive care unit and receiving mechanically ventilated support. Participants were randomized to a control group or an intervention group. The latter received 30 minutes of reflexology therapy on their feet, hands, and ears for 5 days. …”


Results: “The reflexology therapy group had a significantly lower heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and respiratory rate than the control group. A statistically significant difference was found between the averages of the scores that the patients included in the experimental and control groups received from the agitation, anxiety, sleep, and patient-ventilator synchrony subscales of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Sedation Assessment Scale. … “Reflexology can serve as an effective method of decreasing the physiological signs of anxiety and the required level of sedation in patients receiving mechanically ventilated support. Nurses who have appropriate training and certification may include reflexology in routine care to reduce the physiological signs of anxiety of patients receiving mechanical ventilation.”

(5) Akin Korhan, Esra PhD; Khorshid, Leyla PhD; Uyar, Mehmet MD, “Reflexology: Its Effects on Physiological Anxiety Signs and Sedation Needs (in patients receiving mechanically ventilated support/ICU),” Holistic Nursing Practice: January/February 2014 - Volume 28 - Issue 1 - p 6–23 doi: 10.1097/HNP.0000000000000007


(6) Researched: Conscious level

“Methodology: The study group constituted (50) patient (adult mechanically ventilated patients hospitalized in ICU), who was received two reflexology session on feet and the control group constituted (50) patient who was received the routine care, GCS (Glasgow Coma Scale) measured before session, immediate after, post 2 hours and post 4 hours.” A 30-45 minute session was applied including “a mild massage will be done to the all feet and then pressure will be applied once to specified reflex points related to brain, heart, renal and respiratory systems.”


Result: No statistical difference was found in time on mechanical ventilator or days in ICU.  “The findings of the study revealed that there was effect of foot reflexology on the conscious level after the second session … “There was significant increase in GCS (Glasgow Coma Scale). So, because of the positive results of the intervention, the nurse practitioners may be trained about the technique of foot massage and reflexology.”

Maha Salah Abdullah Ismail, Manal S. Ismail, Amir M. Saleh “Effect of Foot Reflexology Treatment on Glasgow Coma Scoring Among Mechanically Ventilated Patients,”IJBPAS International Journal of Biology, Pharmacy and Allied Science), July, 2017, 6(7): 1384-1394, ISSN: 2277–4998; (Full Study available: https://ijbpas.com/pdf/2017/July/1498792891MS%20IJBPAS%202017%204209.pdf)


(7) Researched: Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, percutaneous oxygen saturation, and anxiety

“Results showed a statistically significant difference between intervention and control groups in terms of the level of anxiety (p < 0.05). Also, results showed a statistically significant effect on all physiological parameters except heart rate (p < 0.05).”


“Today,  it  seems  that  non-pharmaceutical therapies such as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) may be used to reduce anxiety [21,37e 40], prevent physiological reactions caused by anxiety [37, 40, 41], stabilize vital signs [42], and manage pain [43]. Since nurses play a key role in predicting psychological and physiological needs of patients and reducing their level of anxiety and stress [25], it seems that nurses can practice some CAMs to reduce stress, pain, and improve the health conditions of patients [44]. As a result, in addition to helping patients relax, nurses can lower the chance of complications by actively reducing the anxiety levels of their patients.””

Kavei, P, Ebadi, A, Saeed Y, Moradian S. T., Sedigh Rahimabadi M,, “Effects of Foot Reflexology on Anxiety and Physiological Parameters in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery: A Clinical Trial,” Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2018 May;31:220-228. PMID: 29705459 DOI: 10.1016/j.ctcp.2018.02.018.


Books by Kunz and Kunz

Research Books

Medical Applications of Reflexology: Findings in Research About Post-operative care, Maternity Care and Cancer Care
Evidenced Based Reflexology Research: For Health Professionals and Researchers
Medical applications of Reflexology:: Findings in Research about Cancer Care

Bestselling Books


 Reflexology: Hands-on Treatment for Vitality and Well-being
Complete Reflexology for Life: Your Definitive Photographic Reference to the Best Techniques and Treatments  
 

Intermittent Moving Books

Intermittent Moving: How I Lost My Pants and Mastered My Weight
Un-Sit Your Life: The Reflex "Diet" Solution






http://reflexologylive.blogspot.com/2020/08/reflexology-research-with-ventilator.html


Happy Hands: Paraffin wax bath makes aging hands feel better
Lundi 17 aot 2020

Evan-Amos / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)


How do your hands feel right now? Stiff? Hurting? Do you have trouble buttoning buttons? Are your finger joints enlarged or crooked? If so you’re not alone. 


What can be done about aging or arthritic hands? If you are a reflexologist, you, like me, may hear this question frequently. Or, maybe you’re just wondering what to do about hands that no longer work the way you want. Or, for some, your concern is aesthetic—you’re not happy with the way your hands look.

Here’s some good news: there’s a simple, inexpensive and easy thing you can do to make your hands feel and work better.

It’s using a paraffin wax machine with benefits that result from exposing your hands to the warmth and moisture of melted wax. 

Answers to common questions: No it’s not painfully hot. Yes, the wax peels off easily.

Why do this? You’ll want to do this because of what research has found. “Paraffin bath therapy seemed to be effective both in reducing pain and tenderness and maintaining muscle strength in hand osteoarthritis.”


Whether you’ve been diagnosed with osteoarthritis, you’re feeling the years or you’re feeling the need, your hands can benefit. Research shows this treatment results in significant improvements to:

hand pain and stiffness

pain during activities of daily living

range of motion

hand grip and pinch strength

the number of painful and tender joints

maintaining muscle strength.


In other words, “Those who used the paraffin wax experienced more pain relief and stronger hands compared to those who did not use the paraffin wax. Overall, the group using the hot wax treatments seemed to have a little easier time doing all those mundane daily activities like buttoning shirts and tying shoelaces. “ (http://www.healthcentral.com/osteoarthritis/c/240381/160434/treatments-arthritic/)

Our favorite Waxer

https://amzn.to/322nFWy


We receive a small fee if you use this link to purchase you waxer.


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Reflexology Before Shots Makes for a Happier Infant
Vendredi 14 aot 2020

By Tomipelegrin - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=91683887



Nobody likes to see a little one cry but, when it’s time for vaccination shots, it’s inevitable. Things can be better for baby. Research showed reflexology applied before the inoculation reduced crying time and pain afterwards.


Reflexology was applied for 20 to 30 minutes before the inoculations with time depending on the size of the infant’s foot. After the vaccinations, a statistically significant difference was found between the pain scores of infants in the reflexology groups and those in the control group. 


The FLACC pain score found to be 5.47 (± 2.11) in the reflexology group and 9.63 (± .85) in the control group. (Wikipedia: The FLACC scale or Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolabilityscale is a measurement used to assess pain for children between the ages of 2 months and 7 years or individuals that are unable to communicate their pain). The infants in the reflexology group also had lower heart rates, higher oxygen saturation, and shorter crying periods than the infants in the control group.


To try this, gently press on the sole of your baby’s bare or socked foot. As described in Reflexology for Children, “The feet and hands ar natural candidates for playing with an infant. Saying ‘This little piggy went to market’ while pulling or squeezing toes is a staple activity to get an infant’s attention. A few presses here and there and some movements and you have a reflexology session that is an extension of a childhood game.”


 The Effect of Foot Reflexology on Acute Pain in Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Koç T, Gözen D, "The Effect of Foot Reflexology on Acute Pain in Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Worldviews Evid Based Nurs. 2015 Oct;12(5):289-96. doi: 10.1111/wvn.12099. PMID: 26220257 

Books by Kunz and Kunz

Research Books

Medical Applications of Reflexology: Findings in Research About Post-operative care, Maternity Care and Cancer Care
Evidenced Based Reflexology Research: For Health Professionals and Researchers
Medical applications of Reflexology:: Findings in Research about Cancer Care

Bestselling Books


 Reflexology: Hands-on Treatment for Vitality and Well-being
Complete Reflexology for Life: Your Definitive Photographic Reference to the Best Techniques and Treatments  
 

Intermittent Moving Books

Intermittent Moving: How I Lost My Pants and Mastered My Weight
Un-Sit Your Life: The Reflex "Diet" Solution




http://reflexologylive.blogspot.com/2020/08/reflexology-before-shots-makes-for.html


A New Era for Reflexology: Is this stuff legit?
Mercredi 12 aot 2020




Is this stuff legit? The question was asked of us about reflexology by a Chicago policeman (it’s a long story) more than 40 years ago. You could say we’ve been answering the question ever since.


Legitimacy draws closer as research emerges to define reflexology in new terms, physiological parameters used by medical science to assess the usefulness of a treatment. It is research that demonstrates the value of reflexology work in a hospital setting.


The discovery of such research started with our preparation to conduct research. At issue: definitively establishing a mechanism of action for the workings of reflexology. Further research would, hopefully, be spurred with the ultimate goal of defining reflexology as a health science practice and more than, as currently seen, a feel good interlude. 


The study will be directed by Dr. Stefan Posse of the Department of Neurology at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine and utilize fMRI and more to explore the issue. It’s been thirty-five years for us of researching others’ research and now we get to participate in doing research.


A first step in conducting research? Finding existing research on similar topics. Surprises always emerge when researching research and the current hunt definitely ventured into surprising territory. It’s always a pleasure for Barbara to search for research and then analyze it. Hours, days, weeks can go by. It doesn’t matter—it’s the hunt and never knowing where you’ll be taken.


Surprises aplenty popped up during a research dive a few years ago. It involved twenty years of gathering research and a year in the analysis and writing. The goal was to make evidence-based predictions about how much reflexology was needed to achieve a specific result. The search entailed sifting through hundreds of reflexology studies and finding the ones that cited how much reflexology work was applied and the results. Approximately 168 met the criteria to make. The result was Evidenced Based Reflexology Research. Among surprises: how much was shown to be achieved during a single reflexology session.


The surprise in the current search of research was seven studies documenting the effect of reflexology work on ventilator-dependent patients. Ventilator use among seriously ill Covid19 patients has been a hot topic recently. While reflexology work was applied for different purposes — following open heart surgery in five studies and with general patients in two — the results speak to possible positive outcomes for the seriously ill.


Another surprise: there is now research extending an understanding of the physiology behind reflexology: heart rate, oxygen saturation, respiratory rate, blood pressure and more. This is new territory, bringing the field of reflexology closer to identifying why and for which results could be achieved. Such studies didn’t exist years before. The paucity of such research left a big whole in credibility  for reflexology. 


There was more: Application of reflexology work to improve hospitalized patient care using the specifics of improvements in physiological parameters. Previous research with hospitalized patients was significant and centered on helping with pain, anxiety and recovery from circumstances of care needed: maternity care, cancer care and post operative.  


Here reflexology was shown to be effective in helping manage the care of ventilator-dependent patients and other hospitalized patients. Opened up was the possibility of helping patients hospitalized for Covid19.


Is this stuff legit? Research will tell the story.


Books by Kunz and Kunz

Research Books

Medical Applications of Reflexology: Findings in Research About Post-operative care, Maternity Care and Cancer Care
Evidenced Based Reflexology Research: For Health Professionals and Researchers
Medical applications of Reflexology:: Findings in Research about Cancer Care

Bestselling Books


 Reflexology: Hands-on Treatment for Vitality and Well-being
Complete Reflexology for Life: Your Definitive Photographic Reference to the Best Techniques and Treatments  
 

Intermittent Moving Books

Intermittent Moving: How I Lost My Pants and Mastered My Weight
Un-Sit Your Life: The Reflex "Diet" Solution



http://reflexologylive.blogspot.com/2020/08/a-new-era-for-reflexology-is-this-stuff.html


The Quarantine Weight Loss Strategy
Mardi 11 aot 2020



Has staying at home impacted your weight in negative ways? You probably realize that you’re sitting more and moving less with all the at-home time. There is a solution: get motivated to sit less and move more.

There are more calories expended as we move more but it’s also about helping our metabolisms work better. You see, our metabolisms go to work when we stand up and shut down as we sit for a long time. Stand up for 90 seconds and your metabolism resets. Sit for an hour and your metabolism shuts down. Take advantage of these facts to lose weight.

Use intermittent moving, a pattern of moving frequently enough to control your weight and waistline, to take full advantage of how the metabolism works. Intermittent moving, planning small amounts of moving throughout the day, helps you accomplish this as you: spend more calories, reset your metabolism, control your appetite and reduce food cravings.

Small amounts of moving throughout the day take place as you take breaks from sitting, taking a fifteen minute walk after eating a meal and accumulate 10,000 steps a day.

Best practice: 10,000 steps a day; 15 minutes of walking after each meal; breaks from sitting of 2 minutes every 30 minutes or at a minimum 5 minutes every hour. Want to lose more? Do more.

Get up and walk as you check social media or talk on the phone. Time yourself or use your step counter as you walk. How many steps can you take? How many calories can you burn? (Every 15 minutes=2,000 steps or 100 calories)


For more ideas about controlling your weight, see Intermittent Moving, How I lost my pants and mastered weight control, Move More • Sit Less • Master Your Weight. https://amzn.to/33AdwA8


Books by Kunz and Kunz

Research Books

Medical Applications of Reflexology: Findings in Research About Post-operative care, Maternity Care and Cancer Care
Evidenced Based Reflexology Research: For Health Professionals and Researchers
Medical applications of Reflexology:: Findings in Research about Cancer Care

Bestselling Books


 Reflexology: Hands-on Treatment for Vitality and Well-being
Complete Reflexology for Life: Your Definitive Photographic Reference to the Best Techniques and Treatments  
 

Intermittent Moving Books

Intermittent Moving: How I Lost My Pants and Mastered My Weight
Un-Sit Your Life: The Reflex "Diet" Solution


http://reflexologylive.blogspot.com/2020/08/the-quarantine-weight-loss-strategy.html


How to take 10,000 steps a day in spite of quarantine
Lundi 10 aot 2020


The secret to taking 10,000 steps a day in spite of staying home? Take a few steps more often. And, best of all, two minutes to fifteen minutes of activity throughout the day is actually better for you.


I’ve managed 10,000 steps and more for a number of years now by walking small amounts throughout the day. Get away from thinking like my friends who were discouraged about not reaching their goals. Both were intent on racking up most of their steps on a single daily walk outside. This is not easy any time and can be difficult to impossible in time of social discouraged movement away from home.


First secret: Walk where you live. Your living room, patio, balcony, front yard all make for fine step-taking tracks. Even if it’s six steps one direction and six steps back, steps are steps. (And, yes, a living room path is the track of many of my 10,000 step days. Yes, I’ve worked from home for years so it’s been easy to hone my method.)


Second secret: Entertain yourself as you walk. Listen to music, watch television, read. Time will go faster. 


Here’s you motivation: the best possible use of your steps is all about timing. It’s when you take the steps that will make the most difference to you and you well-being. Taking steps timed to after meal and as an interruption in sitting impact lifestyle conditions. Impacted are: weight, cardiovascular disease, cognition, productivity, dementia and Alzheimer’s cancer diabetes, metabolic syndrome.


Here’s the best schedule for your body and, funny thing, by the end of the day you’ll reach 10,00 steps the easy way:


Walk for 15 minutes after each meal. That’s about 4,500 steps (1,500 steps per meal).

Get up and move for 5 minutes every hour. That’s 6,000 steps over 12 hours.


There you’ve done it: taken 10,000 steps. Way to go.


For more information see, Intermittent Moving: Move more, Sit less and Master your weight and Un-Sit Your Life.


Books by Kunz and Kunz

Research Books

Medical Applications of Reflexology: Findings in Research About Post-operative care, Maternity Care and Cancer Care
Evidenced Based Reflexology Research: For Health Professionals and Researchers
Medical applications of Reflexology:: Findings in Research about Cancer Care

Bestselling Books


 Reflexology: Hands-on Treatment for Vitality and Well-being
Complete Reflexology for Life: Your Definitive Photographic Reference to the Best Techniques and Treatments  
 

Intermittent Moving Books

Intermittent Moving: How I Lost My Pants and Mastered My Weight
Un-Sit Your Life: The Reflex "Diet" Solution



http://reflexologylive.blogspot.com/2020/08/how-to-take-10000-steps-day-in-spite-of.html


Reflexology Path for Kids: Do-It-Themselves Fun
Samedi 8 aot 2020



Are your kids bored? It’s a common complaint these days. How about some entertainment that’s healthy for them?


A build-it-themselves reflexology path offers such an opportunity. What’s a reflexology path? Imagine a sidewalk with section of varying surfaces arranged to give sensory stimulation to the feet. 


For growing children sensory stimulation of the foot encourages development both physically and mentally. Children’s reflexology paths are found in parks in Korea and schoolchildren in Germany make their won paths by gathering sticks, stones and other elements and arranging them in low-walled boxes.


We once introduced a tribe of three brothers to some simple materials to build their own path and watched them go to work. The fun was in arranging and then re-arranging the segments of the path and then experiencing the path underfoot. 


The do-it-yourself path can be made in minutes outdoors with materials gathered around the garden or easily available materials from a big box store. Station one material after another to form parts of the path, shaped like a sidewalk segment or go free form. Paths can be made for the day, casually laid on the lawn, or a more permanent structure, boxed in wooden outlines.


Safety first. Always consider the surface under the materials of the path. Concrete or asphalt can form a hazardous undersurface with potential for materials to slide or trip. Don’t build your path in an area used commonly as a walkway. 


Some ideas for a casual path:

  • Walk the tight rope: Arrange the garden hose on grass so it snakes around the yard.
  • River rock: Smooth rocks are the easiest on feet.
  • Pebbles
  • Sand
  • Concrete garden edging

For more tips about using reflexology to keep your kids happy and healthy, see Reflexology for Children and Complete Reflexology for Life.

 


For more information about reflexology paths and photos of reflexology paths around the world, see http://www.reflexology-research.com/?page_id=187

 

https://www.pinterest.com/footc1/reflexology-paths-barefoot-parks/


To see do-it-yourself “foot sensation trails” in Germany, see http://www.barfusspark.info/en/path.html.


For ideas about constructing a reflexology path in your yard, see https://playathometeacher.com/2016/06/25/diy-sensory-path/



Books by Kunz and Kunz

Research Books

Medical Applications of Reflexology: Findings in Research About Post-operative care, Maternity Care and Cancer Care
Evidenced Based Reflexology Research: For Health Professionals and Researchers
Medical applications of Reflexology:: Findings in Research about Cancer Care

Bestselling Books


 Reflexology: Hands-on Treatment for Vitality and Well-being
Complete Reflexology for Life: Your Definitive Photographic Reference to the Best Techniques and Treatments  
 

Intermittent Moving Books

Intermittent Moving: How I Lost My Pants and Mastered My Weight
Un-Sit Your Life: The Reflex "Diet" Solution



http://reflexologylive.blogspot.com/2020/08/reflexology-path-for-kids-do-it.html


Colicy Baby, Fussy Baby, Reflexology Fix
Vendredi 7 aot 2020


“We could do that.” The baby’s father had just seen a few minutes of reflexology work quiet his little one. Colic had been an on-going problem and the tired parents welcomed my helping hand. It was a social event and I had been asked if I had any suggestions. I reached over and pressed.


Really, it’s so simple. Just gently press the sole of the foot a few times. Your target is the ball of the foot just below the big toe. How often? How much? I don’t have an answer but let experience be your guide. Below are studies that may help.


At least three studies hold promise for success. In one study, for half the babies the number of crying incidents lessened from 90 minus of crying time over 24 hours to less than 30 minutes of crying time. (1)


In another study, reflexology was applied to the infants two days a week for three weeks. “… the mean ICS (Infant Colic Scale) score of the study group was significantly lower than that of control group at the end of the intervention (p < 0.001).


In another study, reflexologists provided three to four sessions over an 8 to 12 day period. A standardized 20-30 minutes of body reflexology work was provided over an hour, creating a relaxed atmosphere and exchange of information with the parents. The session consisted of “gentle pressure treatment of soles and feet, hands, head, face, ears, back, neck and whole stomach area”. Results: “The series of the treatments helped reduce the suffering of all the babies with infant colic. The colic symptoms disappeared on 43% of infants and decreased on the remaining 57%. The parents reported having pleasant experiences with the treatment, regardless whether the colic symptoms disappeared or continued. Parents stated that the treatment reduced the most typical colic symptoms; infants' body tension, colic crying and restless movements, poor sleep quality and irregular bowel movements.”


For more tips about using reflexology to keep your baby happy and healthy, see Reflexology for Children and Complete Reflexology for Life. 

     (1)    Författare: Bennedbaek O, Viktor J, Carlsen KS, Roed H, Vinding H, Lundbye-Christensen S., "Originalets titel: Infants with colic. A heterogeneous group possible to cure? Treatment by pediatric consultation followed by a study of the effect of zone therapy on incurable colic," Publicerad: Ugeskr Laeger 2001 Jul 2;163(27):3773-8).

    (2) Icke S, Genc R. Effect of Reflexology on Infantile Colic. J Altern Complement Med. 2018;24(6):584-588. doi:10.1089/acm.2017.0315

    (3) Hannula, Leena, Puukka, Pauli, Asunmaa, Marjut, Mäkijärvi, Markku, “A pilot study of parents’ experiences of reflexology treatment for infants with colic in Finland,” Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 2019/11/01


Books by Kunz and Kunz

Research Books

Medical Applications of Reflexology: Findings in Research About Post-operative care, Maternity Care and Cancer Care
Evidenced Based Reflexology Research: For Health Professionals and Researchers
Medical applications of Reflexology:: Findings in Research about Cancer Care

Bestselling Books


 Reflexology: Hands-on Treatment for Vitality and Well-being
Complete Reflexology for Life: Your Definitive Photographic Reference to the Best Techniques and Treatments  
 

Intermittent Moving Books

Intermittent Moving: How I Lost My Pants and Mastered My Weight
Un-Sit Your Life: The Reflex "Diet" Solution



http://reflexologylive.blogspot.com/2020/08/colicy-baby-fussy-baby-reflexology-fix.html


Findings in Research: Can Reflexology Help in the Management of Ventilator Dependent or Hospitalized Covid19 Patients
Jeudi 6 aot 2020



Some of the challenges of caring for ventilator-dependent Covid19 patients are cited in recent news articles. Included is the time consuming task of monitoring and adjusting oxygen levels (1) as well as the increased use of painkillers and sedatives leading to potential shortages of the drugs (2). 


In one example of reflexology research, ventilator dependent ICU patients showed statistically significant differences in sedation and patient-ventilator syncrony following 30 minutes of targeted reflexology work for each of five days. Also improved were other signs of sedation assessment agitation, anxiety, and sleep. In addition physiological parameters of anxiety improved: significantly lower heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and respiratory rate. (3)


Reflexology was seen by multiple researchers as a non-pharmacological treatment option for nursing care to address physiological and psychological problems presented by ventilator dependent patients: reducing anxiety, preventing physiological reactions caused by anxiety, stabilizing vital signs and managing pain. (4) Such goals are of interest in the management of the sickest of all Covid19 patients, those on a ventilator. While less urgent these goals are also important to those hospitalized with Covid19.


A single round of reflexology work applied to specific reflex areas of the feet was found to create significant differences from control group patients for ventilator-dependent patients recovering from open-heart surgery. (5) In addition significant differences were found when a single bout of reflexology work was applied to hospitalized patients. (9-18) Significant differences were reported in physiologic parameters as well as anxiety and pain. 


Two (5) (6) of four studies of ventilator-dependent patients found significantly improved physiology parameters. Noted in parentheses is the number of studies finding differences from the control group in: oxygen saturation [2], heart rate [1], respiratory rate [2], mean arterial pressure [2], systolic and diastolic blood pressure [2]. One study found anxiety and agitation was significantly reduced following 30 minutes of reflexology work (6) while another found anxiety was not reduced following 20 minutes of reflexology work (7). Three of three studies found reduced time spent weaning patients from the ventilator, important following recovery from open heart surgery, by 39 minutes (4), 100 minutes (8) and 165 minutes (5).


Significant differences in physiologic parameters were found for hospitalized patients in nine ((9) through (18) in References) of ten ((19) in References) studies. Noted in parentheses is the number of studies finding differences from the control group in: heart rate [3], pulse rate [3], respiratory rate [6], breathing [1], mean arterial pressure [2], temperature [1], blood pressure [4], systolic [3] and diastolic [2] blood pressure. Significant differences in level of anxiety were found in two of the three studies that looked at the issue.


References

  1. Bernstein, Lenny, “Ventilator use is helping save lives,” Albuquerque Journal, July 14, 2020, p. B-3
  2. Hopkins, Jared S., “Hospital Stockpiling Sparks Drug Shortage,” Wall Street Journal, p. A-1

(3) Akin Korhan, Esra PhD; Khorshid, Leyla PhD; Uyar, Mehmet MD, “Reflexology: Its Effects on Physiological Anxiety Signs and Sedation Needs,” Holistic Nursing Practice: January/February 2014 - Volume 28 - Issue 1 - p 6–23 doi: 10.1097/HNP.0000000000000007

(4) Abbas Ebadi, Parasoo Kavei, Seyyed Tayyeb Moradian, Yaser Saeid, “The Effect of Foot Reflexology on Physiologic Parameters and Mechanical Ventilation Weaning Time in Patients Undergoing Open-Heart Surgery: A Clinical Trial Study” Complement Ther Clin Pract 2015 Aug;21(3):188-92. PMID: 26256138

(5) Elsayed, Amira, Kandeel, Nahed, El-Aziz, Wafaa, “The Effect of Foot Reflexology on Physiological Indicators and Mechanical Ventilation Weaning Time among Open-Heart Surgery Patients” American Journal of Nursing Research. 2019, 7(4), 412-419 DOI: 10.12691/ajnr-7-4-2

(6)Yaser Abbaszadeh, Atefeh Allahbakhshian, Alehe Seyyedrasooli, Parvin Sarbakhsh, Sakineh Goljarian, Naser Safaei, Yaser Abbaszadeh Atefeh AllahbakhshianAlehe SeyyedrasooliParvin Sarbakhsh, “Effects of Foot Reflexology on Anxiety and Physiological Parameters in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery: A Clinical Trial,” Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2018 May;31:220-228. PMID: 29705459

(7) Kavei, P, Ebadi, A, Saeed Y, Moradian S. T., Sedigh Rahimabadi M, “Effect of Reflexology on Anxiety and Agitation in patients Under Mechanical Ventilation after Open Heart Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial Study, Journal of Clinical Nursing and Midwifery, Spring 2015, Volume 4, Number 1; Pages 16-26

(8)Didem Kandemir, “How Effective Is Reflexology on Physiological Parameters and Weaning Time from Mechanical Ventilation in Patients Undergoing Cardiovascular Surgery?,” European Journal of Integrative Medicine 26 · February 2019DOI: 10.1016/j.eujim.2019.01.008

(9) Arash Khalili, Negin Masoudi Alavi, Davoud Mardani, Nastoor Bekhradiani Pour, Akvan Paymard, Mehdi Daraei, Shapour Yaripoor, Saba Bashiri and Mehdi Molavi Vardanjani, “The effect of foot reflexology on physiological parameters,” International Journal of Medical Research & Health Sciences, 2016/09/01

(10) Mahin Moeini, Leila Sadat Kahangi, Mahboobeh Valiani, Reza Heshmat, “The Effect of Reflexotherapy on Patients’ Vital Signs Before Bypass Graft Surgery,” Iran J Nurs Midwifery Res, Winter 2011;16(1):8-12 PMID: 22039373 PMCID: PMC3203304

(11) Khosrow Hashemzadeh, Marjan Dehdilani, Mehdi Khanbabayi Gol, “Effects of Foot Reflexology on Post-sternotomy Hemodynamic Status and Pain in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft: A Randomized Clinical Trial” Published 2019, Corpus ID: 211201347

(12) Fatemeh Rigi, Aram Feiz, Zainab American, Mohsen Naseri, Shahyad Salehi, “The Effect of foot reflexology massage on physiological parameters in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass,” Complementary Medicine Journal of (Arak University) Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, 2014; 4 (3) :865-875 Corpus ID: 110819484

(13) Vinaya Anjaly Thomas,  Shweta Pattnaik, “Effect of Foot Reflexology on Vital Parameters of Hypertensive Patients” Published 2017 Corpus ID: 195746695

(14) Quattrin R., Zanini A., Buchini S., Turello D., Annunziata M. A., Vidotti C., Colmbatti A. & Brusaferro S. “Use of reflexology foot massage to reduce anxiety in hospitalized cancer patients in chemotherapy treatment: methodology and outcomes,” (2006) Journal of Nursing Management 14, 96–105

(15) Fatemeh Heidari, Nahid Rejeh, Majideh Heravi-Karimooi, Kamran Ghodes, Mehrdad Karimi, Davood Tadrissi, “The effect of stress on foot reflex zone therapy on anxiety, hemodynamic parameters of patients waiting for cardiac catheterization,”Avicenna Journal of Nursing and Midwifery Care Summer 2015 Volume 23 Number 2 (49) #G00167; Pages 63 to 73

(16) M. Torabi, M. Salavati, A. Ghahri Sarabi, "Effect of Foot Reflexology Massage and Benson Relaxation Techniques on Anxiety and Physiological Indexes of Patients Undergoing Coronary Heart Angiography," Iran Avicenna Journal of Nursing and Midwifery Care Volume 20, Issue 1 (5-2012)

(17) Khosrow Hashemzadeh, Marjan Dehdilani, Mehdi Khanbabayi Gol, “Effects of Foot Reflexology on Post-sternotomy Hemodynamic Status and Pain in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft: A Randomized Clinical Trial,” Crescent Journal of Medical and Biological Sciences, Vol. 6, No. 4, October 2019, 517–522 eISSN 2148-9696

(18) Hassani, S., & Hassani, K. (2015). “The Effect of Foot Reflexology on Physiologic Indices and Pain Severity Following Cesarean Delivery.” Research Journal of Medical Sciences, 9(3), 114-117
(19) Mehrnoosh Khoshtarash, Atefeh Ghanbari Mohammad Reza Yegane, Ehsan Kazemnejhad, Parvine Rezasoltani, “Effects of foot reflexology on pain and physiological parameters after cesarean section,” Iran Koomesh Autumn 2012, 14 (1): 109 - 116



Books by Kunz and Kunz

Research Books


Medical Applications of Reflexology: Findings in Research About Post-operative care, Maternity Care and Cancer Care

Evidenced Based Reflexology Research: For Health Professionals and Researchers

Medical applications of Reflexology:: Findings in Research about Cancer Care

Bestselling Books

 Reflexology: Hands-on Treatment for Vitality and Well-being

Complete Reflexology for Life: Your Definitive Photographic Reference to the Best Techniques and Treatments   

Intermittent Moving Books

Intermittent Moving: How I Lost My Pants and Mastered My Weight

Un-Sit Your Life: The Reflex "Diet" Solution








http://reflexologylive.blogspot.com/2020/08/findings-in-research-can-reflexology.html


Healthy Entertainment During the Quarantine- Reflexology Paths for Children:
Mercredi 15 juillet 2020


Are your kids bored? It’s a common complaint these days. How about some entertainment that’s healthy for them?

A build-it-themselves reflexology path offers such an opportunity. What’s a reflexology path? Imagine a sidewalk with section of varying surfaces arranged to give sensory stimulation to the feet. 

For growing children sensory stimulation of the foot encourages development both physically and mentally. Children’s reflexology paths are found in parks in Korea and schoolchildren in Germany make their won paths by gathering sticks, stones and other elements and arranging them in low-walled boxes.

We once introduced a tribe of three brothers to some simple materials to build their own path and watched them go to work. The fun was in arranging and then re-arranging the segments of the path and then experiencing the path underfoot. 

The do-it-yourself path can be made in minutes outdoors with materials gathered around the garden or easily available materials from a big box store. Station one material after another to form parts of the path, shaped like a sidewalk segment or go free form. Paths can be made for the day, casually laid on the lawn, or a more permanent structure, boxed in wooden outlines.

Safety first. Always consider the surface under the materials of the path. Concrete or asphalt can form a hazardous undersurface with potential for materials to slide or trip. Don’t build your path in an area used commonly as a walkway. 

Some ideas for a casual path:
  • Walk the tight rope: Arrange the garden hose on grass so it snakes around the yard.
  • River rock: Smooth rocks are the easiest on feet.
  • Pebbles
  • Sand
  • Concrete garden edging
  • Dowel sticks

For more information about reflexology paths and photos of reflexology paths around the world, see http://www.reflexology-research.com/?page_id=187

 


To see the do-it-yourself “foot sensation trails” of Germany, see http://www.barfusspark.info/en/path.html.

For ideas about constructing a reflexology path in your yard, see https://playathometeacher.com/2016/06/25/diy-sensory-path/

Tweets
Kids bored during the quarantine? Help them create some fun with a do-it-themselves reflexology path, providing a healthful sensory experience.

Looking for physical activity for the kids? Help them build a fun walking path that will lead them to taking more steps as well as experiencing healthful do-it-themselves foot reflexology. 

How many steps do your kids take every day? Put some fun into taking steps for your kids with a build-it-themselves foot reflexology path. 


http://reflexologylive.blogspot.com/2020/07/healthy-entertainment-during-quarantine.html


Ventilators, Reflexology and Research
Lundi 13 juillet 2020

Brian Hall / Public domain
Ventilators, Reflexology and Research: Reflexology Use an Effective Treatment Application to Address Patients’ Physical and Psychological Problems

Multiple studies show reflexology helps in the treatment of patients placed on mechanical ventilators. Five of six studies, all but one noting its use as “an effective nursing intervention,” recommended nurses’ training in and use of foot reflexology for patients on mechanical ventilators. (1, 2, 3, 5, 6) 


Results of the studies noted patients experienced: improved physiological parameters (e.g. heart rate, oxygen saturation) (2, 5); lessened anxiety and agitation as well as better sleep and patient-ventilator synchrony; (5) less use of drugs for sedation (2, 5) and pain (2); shorter length of time on the ventilator (weaning time) (1, 2, 3) and increased level of consciousness for those in a coma (6).


Ventilator use creates problems for patients

Problems result for patients placed on a ventilator. As noted by researchers Abbas Ebadi et al: “Studies have shown that prolonged mechanical ventilation increases healthcare costs and also negatively affects patients’ cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, and musculoskeletal systems, fluid and electrolyte balance and psychological state. … MV (Mechanical Ventilator) associated with physical and psychological problems cause considerable stress to patients ….  This stress, in turn, stimulates sympathetic and neuroendocrine responses, disturbs patients' sleep, increases cardiac muscle oxygen demand, and causes tachypnea, and hypertension …. Accordingly, patients who receive MV usually are treated with sedatives, hypnotic, and tranquilizers to alleviate their pain, stress, and anxiety and also to prevent from patient-ventilatory asynchrony …. However, these agents can slow the process of weaning from MV ….” (1)


Why the therapeutic application of reflexology is important for patients using ventilators 

Reflexology provides a therapeutic application with advantages over other methods utilized to address physical and psychological problems experienced by patients on ventilators. (1) 


As noted by researchers Abbas Ebadi et al: Complementary therapies and non-pharmacological interventions are noninvasive, simple and less expensive, and have less or no adverse effects compared with pharmacological remedies. Shortening the length of mechanical ventilation (MV) and lowering dose of sedatives among critically ill patients can decrease complications, intensive care length of stay and mortality rate. Therefore, introducing  non-pharmacologic interventions such as reflexology became an issue of concern for critical care nurses.” (1)


Researchers Elsayed et al note: “Some studies revealed that foot reflexology has immediate effects on reducing heart rate (HR), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP & DBP), and increasing arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) …. These findings are worthy of getting the attention of critical care nurses as the improvement of vital signs without medications is a significant goal of care. Additionally, foot reflexology can be used to improve physiological indicators in unconscious patients in ICUs.” (2)


Researchers Elsayed et al further note: “It had been proven that foot reflexology massage is an efficient technique in decreasing postoperative pain and the use of analgesics, as well as lowering anxiety levels 19. Additionally, it has been reported that foot reflexology is a useful method for managing incision pain after coronary artery bypass graft surgery . Reflexology is an effective method for improving muscle comfort by enhancing blood flow which stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system .” (2)


Among results noted by researchers:

“Conclusion: Study findings indicate that foot reflexology is an effective nursing intervention for facilitating MV (Mechanical Ventilator) weaning after OHS (Open Heart Surgery). Given the simplicity, safety, and cost-effectiveness of foot reflexology, we recommend the development and implementation of reflexology training programs for both nursing and practicing nurses.” (1)


“Conclusion: Foot reflexology is an effective method for stabilizing physiological indicators and decreasing ventilator dependence among patients undergoing OHS (Open Heart Surgery). Therefore, it can be introduced as an adjunct to daily care of OHS patients in ICU.” (2)


“… Reflexology did not have a significant effect on physiological parameters in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support. Shortening the weaning time from mechanical ventilation suggests that it might be applied effectively in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support in intensive care unit.” (3)


“Conclusion: Foot reflexology massage in reflection points of the heart and lung in patients after surgery did not reduce anxiety and agitation in patients.” (4)


“Reflexology can serve as an effective method of decreasing the physiological signs of anxiety and the required level of sedation in patients receiving mechanically ventilated support. Nurses who have appropriate training and certification may include reflexology in routine care to reduce the physiological signs of anxiety of patients receiving mechanical ventilation.” (5)


“There was significant increase in (conscious level as measured by) GCS (Glasgow Coma Scale). So, because of the positive results of the intervention, the nurse practitioners may be trained about the technique of foot massage and reflexology.” (6)


References

Mechanical ventilator: Physiological parameters (Pulse rate, respiratory rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, mean arterial pressure, percutaneous oxygen saturation); Weaning time

1 Abbas EbadiParastoo KaveiSeyyed Tayyeb MoradianYaser Saeid “The Effect of Foot Reflexology on Physiologic Parameters and Mechanical Ventilation Weaning Time in Patients Undergoing Open-Heart Surgery: A Clinical Trial Study” Complement Ther Clin Pract 2015 Aug;21(3):188-92. PMID: 26256138 DOI: 10.1016/j.ctcp.2015.07.001


Mechanical ventilator: Physiological parameters (Heart rate, respiratory rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, oxygen saturation); Weaning time; Sedation and analgesic drug use

2 Elsayed, Amira, Kandeel, Nahed, El-Aziz, Wafaa, “The Effect of Foot Reflexology on Physiological Indicators and Mechanical Ventilation Weaning Time among Open-Heart Surgery Patients” American Journal of Nursing Research. 2019, 7(4), 412-419 DOI: 10.12691/ajnr-7-4-2

(Full study available: http://pubs.sciepub.com/ajnr/7/4/2/index.html)


Mechanical ventilator: Heart rate, Oxygen saturation

3 Didem Kandemir, “How Effective Is Reflexology on Physiological Parameters and Weaning Time from Mechanical Ventilation in Patients Undergoing Cardiovascular Surgery?,” European Journal of Integrative Medicine 26 · February 2019DOI: 10.1016/j.eujim.2019.01.008


Mechanical ventilator: Anxiety, Agitation

4 Kavei, P, Ebadi, A, Saeed Y, Moradian S. T., Sedigh Rahimabadi M, “.Effect of Reflexology on Anxiety and Agitation in patients Under Mechanical Ventilation after Open Heart Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial Study,  Journal of Clinical Nursing and Midwifery, Spring 2015, Volume 4, Number 1; Pages 16-26


Mechanical ventilator: Physiological anxiety signs (Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, respiratory rate); Sedation

5 Akin Korhan, Esra PhD; Khorshid, Leyla PhD; Uyar, Mehmet MD, “Reflexology: Its Effects on Physiological Anxiety Signs and Sedation Needs (in patients receiving mechanically ventilated support/ICU),” Holistic Nursing Practice: January/February 2014 - Volume 28 - Issue 1 - p 6–23 doi: 10.1097/HNP.0000000000000007


Mechanical ventilator: Consciousness (Glasgow Coma Scoring)

6 Maha Salah Abdullah Ismail, Manal S. Ismail, Amir M. Saleh “Effect of Foot Reflexology Treatment on Glasgow Coma Scoring Among Mechanically Ventilated Patients,”IJBPAS International Journal of Biology, Pharmacy and Allied Science), July, 2017, 6(7): 1384-1394, ISSN: 2277–4998; (Full Study available: https://ijbpas.com/pdf/2017/July/1498792891MS%20IJBPAS%202017%204209.pdf)


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Connection Between Touch and Physical Well-being
Mardi 7 janvier 2020

Human beings need touch in a very literal sense. Being touched in a positive way affects our physiology and gives us a sense of overall well-being. The lack of touch from a very young age can actually affect growth and development. Research and observation of children who have been deprived of touch has shown that they exhibit cognitive delays, decrease in growth, and an increase in aggressive behaviors. In Romania, where national policies on childbearing led to a skyrocketing birth rate,
https://www.cindyholmreflexology.com/single-post/2020/01/06/Connection-Between-Touch-and-Physical-Well-being